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Pay for your tickets for the official Bitcoin conference 2014 in Amsterdam with ...

Pay for your tickets for the official Bitcoin conference 2014 in Amsterdam with ... submitted by oerwouter to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[dev] Scottish Bitcoin Conference 2014

So the big thing for me this week has been attending the first Scottish Bitcoin Conference. It’s been really interesting to find out what’s going on in the Bitcoin and altcoin space in general, and an excellent opportunity to meet and network. This week’s news will primarily involve my notes from the conference; note that I do not necessarily agree with all points stated (or even most), these are just the parts I thought was interesting.
First though, 1.8 is now out, and you need to upgrade in order to be on the correct fork after block 371337. Patrick & I spent several hours on Sunday doing a large-scale stress test on the testnet, and it all looks rock solid. I started up 12 relay nodes, 2 mining pools (one mining LTC and DOGE, one DOGE only) and a desktop client in addition to the existing infrastructure in place, and then pointed rented rigs at each of the mining pools in an attempt to cause a fork. Meanwhile, Patrick generated up to 100 transactions a minute (10 times the normal load on production), and ran his own mining rig. Everything worked smoothly, with no problems arising, which is extremely positive.
Back to the conference, and apologies this is going to be a bit rambly as I’m in a rush right now. There conference consisted of a full day of talks on a wide range of topics including economy, investment, regulation, services, etc.
Probably the most exciting part for most of the Dogecoin community was that I had an opportunity to talk to Wouter Vonk BitPay about altcoin adoption, and while certainly no timeline was suggested, BitPay are open to the idea and the main concern raised was that market volume needs to be enough to handle the sort of trade volume they see. A lot of BitPay’s customers opt to exchange directly through to conventional currencies rather than hold cryptocurrencies, and BitPay needs to know they can exchange the coins they receive into conventional currency. For scale, BitPay cleared €7mil in transactions in 2013, and €26mil in 2014 so far.
I’ll follow up with Wouter in the next couple of days, perhaps see if there’s scope for adoption by smaller merchants only, and offer our assistance if they want to adopt Dogecoin. The other takeaway from this was that they were really interested to know what our volume through existing payment processors is like, as well as general volume. Market research and business intelligence data gathering are therefore things we need to be looking at more (and I’ll touch on those later).
Talking of trading, volatility was discussed in a number of the talks, and I personally found it interesting that while volatility scares off western users, it reportedly attracts Chinese users. One presenter suggested that volatility drives trading and that traders are required to bring money into the market; I agree with the first statement but disagree with the second (traders provide liquidity, but tend to remove value from the market in terms of their profits, rather than adding it).
Garrick Hileman gave a talk on the economic context of Bitcoin, and here the scale of other digital currencies is also interesting as a comparison for the current market cap of Dogecoin and scope for future growth. The now defunct Beenz apparently attracted $100m in VC funding. Compare with the current market cap of Dogecoin at $10m and hopefully it’s clear just how much room there is for Dogecoin to grow. Garrick’s talk also touched on inflation, and at the current time over 70 countries have an inflation rate above 5% (the predicted peak inflation rate for Doge once the main mining period ends).
Lastly, there was a really interesting talk from Lui Smyth of Coinjar about who Bitcoin early adopters are, and I wanted to look at gathering some comparable statistics for Dogecoin. The Bitcoin users surveyed tend to have a median age of 30, 60% have never mined (up from 50% in 2013), and the majority are not libertarian (although the libertarian groups have adopted Bitcoin in a big way).
So, I’d like to gather some data on who uses Dogecoin and how you use it. I’ve put together an anonymous survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/36QB3BX - if you could complete whichever questions are you comfortable with, it would be greatly appreciated. Results in aggregate will be stored indefinitely and used for marketing purposes. No personally identifying information is retained by the survey setter (myself).
submitted by rnicoll to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Robert Murphy at Texas Bitcoin Conference 2014 about Austrian Economics, money theory and Bitcoin

Robert Murphy at Texas Bitcoin Conference 2014 about Austrian Economics, money theory and Bitcoin submitted by kyletorpey to Anarcho_Capitalism [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Conference 2014 - China

i notice that the conference is this upcoming weekend: http://bitcoinexpo2014.com/
There was a Potfunder initiative and the funds requested had been donated, so Potcoin Systems is still expected to go, right?
Can someone provide us with an update?
Are you scheduled to speak on a panel, will there be a booth, or are you just going there to mingle? What's the plan?
thanks
submitted by b4ked-n-2t0ned to potcoin [link] [comments]

Robert Murphy at Texas Bitcoin Conference 2014 about Austrian Economics, money theory and Bitcoin

Robert Murphy at Texas Bitcoin Conference 2014 about Austrian Economics, money theory and Bitcoin submitted by kyletorpey to austrian_economics [link] [comments]

Anyone attending the Bitcoin Conference 2014 in Amsterdam?

I am planning on going to the Bitcoin Conference 2014 to show some Vertcoin presence and I was wondering if I would meet any of you guys there to hang out and chat. :)
Also, if one of you crypto and Vertcoin enthusiasts lives in Amsterdam; I am looking for a place to crash for these 3 to 4 days. Any help/ideas highly appreciated! :)
submitted by lacksfish to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Ricky James on Texas Bitcoin Conference 2014 promoting NXT

Ricky James on Texas Bitcoin Conference 2014 promoting NXT submitted by Advix to NXT [link] [comments]

140 Speakers and Panelists ready for The Bitcoin Conference 2014, starting in one week.

140 Speakers and Panelists ready for The Bitcoin Conference 2014, starting in one week. submitted by elux to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Berlin Bitcoin Conference 2014

Berlin Bitcoin Conference 2014 submitted by BitcoinWallet to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Monetas Team Members Panel Discussion - Moving Beyond Mt. Gox (Texas Bitcoin Conference 2014)

submitted by edugarbizu to opentransactions [link] [comments]

[dev] Scottish Bitcoin Conference 2014

So the big thing for me this week has been attending the first Scottish Bitcoin Conference. It’s been really interesting to find out what’s going on in the Bitcoin and altcoin space in general, and an excellent opportunity to meet and network. This week’s news will primarily involve my notes from the conference; note that I do not necessarily agree with all points stated (or even most), these are just the parts I thought was interesting.
First though, 1.8 is now out, and you need to upgrade in order to be on the correct fork after block 371337. Patrick & I spent several hours on Sunday doing a large-scale stress test on the testnet, and it all looks rock solid. I started up 12 relay nodes, 2 mining pools (one mining LTC and DOGE, one DOGE only) and a desktop client in addition to the existing infrastructure in place, and then pointed rented rigs at each of the mining pools in an attempt to cause a fork. Meanwhile, Patrick generated up to 100 transactions a minute (10 times the normal load on production), and ran his own mining rig. Everything worked smoothly, with no problems arising, which is extremely positive.
Back to the conference, and apologies this is going to be a bit rambly as I’m in a rush right now. There conference consisted of a full day of talks on a wide range of topics including economy, investment, regulation, services, etc.
Probably the most exciting part for most of the Dogecoin community was that I had an opportunity to talk to Wouter Vonk BitPay about altcoin adoption, and while certainly no timeline was suggested, BitPay are open to the idea and the main concern raised was that market volume needs to be enough to handle the sort of trade volume they see. A lot of BitPay’s customers opt to exchange directly through to conventional currencies rather than hold cryptocurrencies, and BitPay needs to know they can exchange the coins they receive into conventional currency. For scale, BitPay cleared €7mil in transactions in 2013, and €26mil in 2014 so far.
I’ll follow up with Wouter in the next couple of days, perhaps see if there’s scope for adoption by smaller merchants only, and offer our assistance if they want to adopt Dogecoin. The other takeaway from this was that they were really interested to know what our volume through existing payment processors is like, as well as general volume. Market research and business intelligence data gathering are therefore things we need to be looking at more (and I’ll touch on those later).
Talking of trading, volatility was discussed in a number of the talks, and I personally found it interesting that while volatility scares off western users, it reportedly attracts Chinese users. One presenter suggested that volatility drives trading and that traders are required to bring money into the market; I agree with the first statement but disagree with the second (traders provide liquidity, but tend to remove value from the market in terms of their profits, rather than adding it).
Garrick Hileman gave a talk on the economic context of Bitcoin, and here the scale of other digital currencies is also interesting as a comparison for the current market cap of Dogecoin and scope for future growth. The now defunct Beenz apparently attracted $100m in VC funding. Compare with the current market cap of Dogecoin at $10m and hopefully it’s clear just how much room there is for Dogecoin to grow. Garrick’s talk also touched on inflation, and at the current time over 70 countries have an inflation rate above 5% (the predicted peak inflation rate for Doge once the main mining period ends).
Lastly, there was a really interesting talk from Lui Smyth of Coinjar about who Bitcoin early adopters are, and I wanted to look at gathering some comparable statistics for Dogecoin. The Bitcoin users surveyed tend to have a median age of 30, 60% have never mined (up from 50% in 2013), and the majority are not libertarian (although the libertarian groups have adopted Bitcoin in a big way).
So, I’d like to gather some data on who uses Dogecoin and how you use it. I’ve put together an anonymous survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/36QB3BX - if you could complete whichever questions are you comfortable with, it would be greatly appreciated. Results in aggregate will be stored indefinitely and used for marketing purposes. No personally identifying information is retained by the survey setter (myself).
submitted by rnicoll to dogecoindev [link] [comments]

The Scottish Bitcoin Conference 2014

I'm happy to announce that I've now managed to finalise the details for the first ever Scottish Bitcoin Conference. It will be held in Edinburgh on Saturday August 23rd 2014 - check out the details as they get updated at the website (www.scottishbitcoinconference.com).
This is the first Bitcoin Conference that Scotland has ever hosted and we have a fantastic line-up set for the day, including:-
Jon Matonis (Bitcoin Foundation) Moe Levin (BitPay) Ganesh Ganesan (PeerNova) Garrick Hileman (LSE) David Irvine (MaidSafe) Tom Robinson (Elliptic) Michael Parsons (Breaking Bit)
...plus many more still to be confirmed during a packed day's schedule at CodeBase, the largest technology incubator in Scotland (http://www.thisiscodebase.com/).
The best news? We've managed to cap the ticket cost at only £50 each (payable in either Bitcoin/sterling). I'm pretty certain that makes it one of the cheapest conferences out there. However, as a result, tickets are limited so if you're interested in coming along, please do buy sooner rather than later (< not just marketing speak!). Financially, we're running this with the goal of trying to break even if at all possible so that we can do it all over again next year but I'm mainly keen to ensure that we get some great knowledgeable people in the same room together.
Looking forward to seeing as many of you there as possible in Edinburgh later this Summer! For anyone who might be tempted to make a holiday of it, it's during the Edinburgh Fringe Festival (https://www.edfringe.com/). Any questions, don't hesitate to get in touch, either here or via the website.
submitted by dugcampbell to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Dubai bitcoin conference 2014

Must have been a huge fail, no videos whatsoever uploaded to youtube.
submitted by BitDeath to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Emerging Startups Take Stage at Latin American Bitcoin Conference 2014

Emerging Startups Take Stage at Latin American Bitcoin Conference 2014 submitted by VivaLaPandaReddit to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Emerging Startups Take Stage at Latin American Bitcoin Conference 2014

Emerging Startups Take Stage at Latin American Bitcoin Conference 2014 submitted by VivaLaPandaReddit to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Chris Odom at Australian Bitcoin Conference 2014 - Open Transactions (Decentralization)

submitted by edugarbizu to opentransactions [link] [comments]

Robert Murphy at Texas Bitcoin Conference 2014 about Austrian Economics, money theory and Bitcoin

Robert Murphy at Texas Bitcoin Conference 2014 about Austrian Economics, money theory and Bitcoin submitted by Malthus0 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Emerging Startups Take Stage at Latin American Bitcoin Conference 2014

Emerging Startups Take Stage at Latin American Bitcoin Conference 2014 submitted by BTCNews to BTCNews [link] [comments]

Robert Murphy at Texas Bitcoin Conference 2014 about Austrian Economics, money theory and Bitcoin

Robert Murphy at Texas Bitcoin Conference 2014 about Austrian Economics, money theory and Bitcoin submitted by cryptocurrencylive to CryptoCurrencyLive [link] [comments]

Texas Bitcoin Conference 2014 on Mt. Gox (with A. Antonopoulos)

Texas Bitcoin Conference 2014 on Mt. Gox (with A. Antonopoulos) submitted by b0bke to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

4/28/14 Video News - Silk Road's Slomp, Amsterdam ATM, Ohio BTC booze ban & bitcoin on Yelp

Video: http://moneyandtech.com/apr28-news-update/
Start off your week with today's top news stories in Money & Tech:
Prolific Silk Road vendor Cornelis Jan Slomp, or “SuperTrips” as he's known to his customers, plead guilty to federal charges of conspiracy to import and distribute various controlled substances, including 104 kilograms of MDMA, and substantial quantities of cocaine, LSD, marijuana, methamphetamine, ketamine, and Xanax. Slomp had allegedly been importing envelopes containing these substances through the Chicago O’Hare International Airport, where an undercover investigation caught up with him. Slomp will be tried in the Federal Court in Chicago, where he faces a mandatory minimum of 5yrs and a maximum of 40yrs in prison with a $5 million fine.
Already becoming a bitcoin-friendly city, Amsterdam now has a bitcoin ATM. The new BTC-O-MATIC machine has been installed at coffee shop Courtyard of Wise, near the Amsterdam Central station, and will be operating this Wednesday during the Dutch Ethereum & Bitcoin Meetup. The machine has also arrived in time for the Bitcoin Conference 2014 coming up in May.
BitcoinWebHosting.net has partnered with Sucuri Security to offer website protection and malware removal for bitcoin. Now Bitcoin Web Hosting customers can opt-in to Sucuri's website security suite, which includes protection from DDoS attacks, out-of-date software, malware distribution and website blacklisting. As Sucuri COO Tony Perez puts it, ""It's our mission to protect every website on the Internet, and [this] is a step in that direction.""
In response to the local Bitcoin Boulevard project in Cleveland’s Cedar & Lee district, Ohio has effectively banned the use of bitcoin for alcohol sales. The state’s Liquor Control Law indicates that payment for alcohol in Ohio with anything other than US currency is prohibited, which includes bitcoin, since it has not been recognized as a currency. Maryland and Nevada have also both issued new advisory warnings on bitcoin, similarly encouraging consumers to ‘do their homework’ and familiarise themselves with the risks of digital currencies.
In the wake of China's renewed vow to cut bitcoin funding, leading bitcoin exchange BTC China has finally been forced to cease customer deposits with the China Merchants Bank. However, CEO Bobby Lee does not expect this closure will have a substantial impact on their business, given that BTC China customers can still use accounts with other financial institutions, including the Bank of China.
Despite the growing uncertainty, China will host its first Bitcoin conference, The Global Bitcoin Summit 2014, which will be held at the China National Convention Center in Beijing on May 10th to 11th. The event hopes to attract top notch experts, economists, investors, lawyers, and even government agencies, to help shed light on future bitcoin trends in China and abroad and help attendees build a bridge for better communications and continued growth.
Bitcoin incubator Boost VC hosted a bitcoin hackathon this past weekend. First place was awarded to bitcoin startup Coinviz, which boasts the ability to easily visualize block chain transactions and information. Second place went to bitcoin derivatives platform Coindash, which helps bitcoin investors hedge their investments for reduced volatility risk. And third place went to betting platform Bitbook.ie.
Yelp appears to have added a new category allowing business owners to specify whether or not they accept bitcoin, under the 'More business info' section on its Yelp page. For bitcoin enthusiasts eager to transact in the cryptocurrency wherever possible, this added feature makes finding local businesses much easier.
submitted by moneyandtech to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Establishing consensus by upgrading software is seriously inefficient - can we get a BIP to support consensus building backed by actual data and statistics?

What we have now: a “pure democracy” a la “voting by selectively updating software”, impassioned, armchair discussion on a myriad of internet forums, and a developer technical consensus, with a critical disconnect between these two groups. --Pantera Capital https://medium.com/@PanteraCapital/the-governance-of-anarchists-blockchain-letter-january-2016-798842f468de#.kkr3mek6k
the well-intentioned must step up to the plate and facilitate the establishment of a scalable Bitcoin . Pantera Capital @medium.com
After watching the bitcoin community have a collective fit over the block size debate I have a few observations.
The one I'd like to offer today is that a consensus driven network should have a simple, clear, and well established framework for communication, especially regarding consensus changes. With such a framework in place, hard and soft data on consensus changes can be aggregated and made public such that economic actors within the bitcoin ecosystem can make informed choices for themselves.
Think about it. If you were going to design a globally distributed and decentralized network that could only be hard forked smoothly if everyone agreed, the first thing you might think about doing would be setting up clear and easy framework for communication amongst nodes about future consensus changes.
In addition, you really want to be able to ignore actors (attackers) who are not generally supportive of the smooth and functional operation of said decentralized system.
It should be noted that any such framework is of course subject to the Sybil attack, however the abstract of the Sybil attack white paper explicitly lists "coordination among entities" as the only way to to mitigate Sybil attacks. I contend that while the coordination among entities doesn't make a Sybil attack impossible, it can clearly mitigate the efficacy of any such attack, possibly to the point of making it a non-issue.
"Sybil attacks are always possible except under extreme and unrealistic assumptions of resource parity and coordination among entities." -- John R. Douceur (http://nakamotoinstitute.org/static/docs/the-sybil-attack.pdf)
As it stands, the default method of communication seems to be to wait for developers to compile new versions of software which then can be installed and queried as to their version (i.e. Classic, Unlimited, Satoshi, XT, etc.)
Having a productive discussion about future consensus changes (hard forks) via software upgrades leaves a lot to be desired.
I assert that this is a suboptimal design (and is probably not a "design" at all).
Proposal: all bitcoin node software should implement a new standard (similar to BIP9) that allows users to edit config files, or command line arguments, or knobs in the GUI in order to communicate responses to upcoming consensus issues. Responses to specific questions can be a lot more useful than opinions on reddit, slack, youtube, medium, etc.
For example, an effective set of questions is:
  1. Do you now have enough bandwidth, or are you willing/able to upgrade your bandwidth to support 8MB blocks?
  2. If you are not willing/able, what is the blocking factor? Money or lack of availability?
  3. If not willing/able and the network upgrades anyway, will you be negatively impacted financially, or just philosophically/emotionally?
As a node operator, I'm willing to upgrade if a few nodes will get shut out due to their 500k/s upload limit, as long as I can see the larger picture and its positive overall.
Other questions:
  1. How much lead time do you need to support X hard fork feature if consensus is reached?
  2. Does your node support an wallet that is in use?
  3. Who are you? (which is completely optional, but major players like exchanges, web-wallets, and miners may choose to verify their identity in order to further the consensus discussion. Node operators may choose who they trust if they care to use that information in their own decisions.)
In addition, perhaps nodes should be enabled to collect and publish statistics on their connections with other nodes, effectively measuring network and node performance, and node age (maybe this exists but I've never seen it published).
When it comes time to suggest that certain consensus or design choices will impact decentralization by making it harder, more expensive, or impossible to run nodes, the discussion can rest on the performance stats, and node age can be used to gauge how many new nodes exist purely to skew the stats.
This technical functionality would enable a data based discussion around hard forks and consensus changes, that I feel is sorely lacking, and desperately needed. Individual node operators need to make informed decisions about their own nodes. This could lead to a situation in which critical mass of consensus is obvious, or consensus is obviously non-existant to the entire developer, node, miner, exchange, and user community.
A closely related issue to this data based discussion capability is that community is currently in the dark when it comes to distinguishing abandoned nodes from nodes trying to reach consensus.
How many nodes have been abandoned? There are nodes running old, insecure versions of bitcoind. Are they still running because someone forgot to shut down a VPS on their company's network? Are they associated with a wallet that is in use or an application that requires that particular version? This distinction is extremely important. In the former, that node can be hard forked off the network with no loss to anyone. In the latter, a benign community should work to find out how to get that node back on an intelligent upgrade path and avoid imposing a hard fork on that node.
I'd venture that no one in the bitcoin community who wants to see it succeed would argue that a forgotten and unused VPS running an old version of bitcoind should be a reason to not give bitcoin that awesome upgrade coming down the pipe that requires a hard fork. Right???
So no amount of awesome technical wizardry thrown at creating a consensus platform will help if the node operators are asleep at the wheel or are running nodes they forgot about.
This leads me to believe that Bitcoin needs a node operators guide that deals directly with this weakness. e.g. in all the places where there are instructions on installing bitcoin nodes, in the README and INSTALL notes of distributions, make it explicit that if you set and forget a bitcoin node install, you're running 100% risk of that node ceasing to operate as intended due to a hard fork. In addition, if you go dark for X months in terms of responding to upcoming consensus polls, you loose the right to complain if you get forked off the network, lose money, or are subject to fraud.
There's a level of responsibility required if you're an honest node operator and want to have control over your own digital assets backed by decentralized trust/verification. Taking that responsibility seriously strengthens the network by making it simple to detect the difference between an attacker who attacks by withholding consensus and an operator who is merely indifferent.
The only way to know that node operators are paying a minimum level of attention is that they are running a recent version. There's no way to prove that they aren't paying attention if they are running an out dated version on their node(s).
OPTION: Certainly bitcoin client software can be written to install automatic updates from the software authors by default, and operators who want to be set-and-forget (run a node purely to support resilience and decentralization) accept that refusing to participate in the consensus process means relinquishing their voice in that process. There's no discernible difference between remaining silent and attacking the network when it comes to change of consensus. If node operators don't want to change, they need to voice that, and then all the other network players need to decide for themselves what to do in response.
Let this be a simple principle: It's effectively impossible to operate a consensus network where the consensus rules are dynamic without establishing an effective communication method about change of consensus.
Bitcoin’s network affect is absolutely incredible, In fact, I think the bigger problem we’re going to have is that we’re going to find it harder and harder to upgrade bitcoin. …. It will become increasingly difficult to achieve consensus for hard fork upgrades”
-- Andreas Antonopoulos, “The Future of Cryptocurrencies” talk at Texas Bitcoin Conference, 2014 27:00
It seems beyond silly that the communities best working definition of "consensus" is "you'll know it when you see it." I run a full node and a couple ASIC miners in a mining pool, and I have very little to go on when it comes to what/who to trust when evaluating the overall network's level of consensus on the current block size debate, or any future consensus change proposal. Maybe key Bitcoin developers and exchange and mining operation heads have the visibility to confidently claim we have or don't have "know it when you see it" consensus, but that visibility isn't available to me (and probably hundreds of other node operators as well.)
All I can see is version numbers of software running on network nodes (and lots of opinions and speculation on all sides), and that's pretty lame.
(Aside: I also deeply appreciate the arguments that hard forks must be done carefully and with as much cooperation as possible, but I see that the actual path from today to hard fork needs a lot of refinement in order to be efficient and safe, and to resist attack and fraud. It seems to me that a defined path doesn't even exist, and I've seen core devs essentially admitting that as well.)
The social networking innovations available today, including reputation points, up-voting, trust established via age of accounts/nodes, peer trust (i.e. social graph), etc, can all be brought to bear on effectively running a decentralized p2p network that protects millions/billions in value for all of us. It's time for a higher level of communication, plainly visible to all.
submitted by netkn0t to btc [link] [comments]

Bitcoin 2014 Conference - Day 3 Highlights Jad Mubaslat the Midwestern Bitcoin Conference 2014 Bitcoin Conference SPB 2014. WILLIAM ROSS - YouTube Bitcoin Conference SPB 2014. ДМИТРИЙ ЖУРАВЛЕВ Bitcoin 2014 conference - Interviewing Jan Møller and Andreas Petersson

Emerging Startups Take Stage at Latin American Bitcoin Conference 2014 The second annual Latin American Bitcoin Conference took place in Rio de Janeiro this weekend, drawing 37 speakers and more ... Keep up to date with the latest bitcoin event news on CoinDesk. You can also check out local Bitcoin Meetups in your area. CoinDesk also runs the Consensus Conference and an ‘Expert Briefings ... Heads up folks! Bitcoin 2014: Building the Digital Economy conference is being held in Amsterdam starting May 15 to 17 2014. Amsterdam Bitcoin 2014 event... Bitcoin 2014. Par. Jean-Luc - 15 mai 2014. 0. 38. La Conférence Bitcoin2014 a débuté à Amsterdam aux Pays-Bas. Issus du monde de la finance, de la technologie ou de l’entreprise, de prestigieux conférenciers se succéderont jusqu’au samedi 17 mai. Programme : En savoir plus : bitcoin2014.com – Galerie photos. Facebook. Twitter . WhatsApp. Linkedin. Telegram. Article précédent Ebay ... Bitcoin history for 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019. Bitcoin price chart since 2009 to 2019. The historical data and rates of BTC ...

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Bitcoin 2014 Conference - Day 3 Highlights

Interview with Roger Ver at the Inside Bitcoin conference in Hong Kong June 25, 2014 - Duration: 10:08. Coin Republic 979 views. 10:08. Navy Pier In Chicago - Duration: 3:32. ... Day 1 of Bitcoin 2014 Conference was held on May 15, 2014. -International Affiliates Summit -Exhibit Opening -Correspondent Reception -Welcome Reception More to come! This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue. Watch Queue Queue All talks and panels from the Inside Bitcoins conference Tel Aviv, October 2014 Jad Mubaslat, founder of Bitquick.co, speaks at Purdue University on November 1st.

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